Friedrich Nietzsche

Wednesday, 28 June 2017

ecce homo quotes, nietzscheEcce Homo ("Behold the man") are the latin words spoken by Pontius Pilate when presenting Jesus Christ before the crowd. Nietzsche wrote the book in 1888, but it was not published until 1908.


How I understand the philosopher - as a terrible explosive, endangering everthing... my concept of the philosopher is worlds removed from any concept that would include even a Kant, not to speak of academic "ruminants" and other professors of philosophy...
Ecce Homo, s 3.2.3
Nietzsche Quotes
The man of knowledge must be able not only to love his enemies but also to hate his friends.
Foreword, Ecce Homo
Nietzsche Quotes
Nothing on earth consumes a man more quickly than the passion of resentment.
Ecce Homo (1888)
Nietzsche Quotes
One must pay dearly for immortality; one has to die several times while still alive.
Ecce Homo (1888)
Nietzsche Quotes
I know my fate. One day my name will be associated with the memory of something tremendous - a crisis without equal on earth, the most profound collision of conscience, a decision that was conjured up against everything that had been believed, demanded, hallowed so far. I am no man, I am dynamite.
Ecce Homo (1888). Why I am a Destiny", 1
Nietzsche Quotes
What does not kill me, makes me stronger.
Ecce Homo (1888). "Why I Am So Wise", 2
Nietzsche Quotes
All things considered, I could never have survived my youth without Wagnerian music. For I seemed condemned to the society of Germans. If a man wishes to rid himself of a feeling of unbearable oppression, he may have to take to hashish. Well, I had to take to Wagner...
Ecce Homo (1888). Why I am So Clever, 6
Nietzsche Quotes
After coming into contact with a religious man I always feel I must wash my hands.
Ecce Homo, "Why I Am a Destiny" (1888)
Nietzsche Quotes
To become what one is, one must not have the faintest idea what one is.
Ecce Homo (1888). Why I am So Clever, 9
Nietzsche Quotes
     


Friedrich Nietzsche Quote of the Day

Wednesday, 28 June 2017
It is mere illusion and pretty sentiment to expect much from mankind if he forgets how to make war. And yet no means are known which call so much into action as a great war, that rough energy born of the camp, that deep impersonality born of hatred, that conscience born of murder and cold-bloodedness, that fervor born of effort of the annihilation of the enemy, that proud indifference to loss, to one's own existence, to that of one's fellows, to that earthquake-like soul-shaking that a people needs when it is losing its vitality.Human, All Too Human (1878).