Friedrich Nietzsche

Wednesday, 29 January 2020

the will to power quotes, nietzscheThe Will to Power is a book containing selectively reordered notes from Friedrich Nietzsche's notebooks, by his sister Elisabeth and Peter Gast. It was first released with other unpublished writings in 1901.


My idea is that every specific body strives to become master over all space and to extend its force (its will to power) and to thrust back all that resists its extension. But it continually encounters similar efforts on the part of other bodies and ends by coming to an arrangement ("union") with those of them that are sufficiently related to it: thus they then conspire together for power. And the process goes on.
The Will to Power
Nietzsche Quotes
Moralities and religions are the principal means by which one can make whatever one wishes out of man, provided one possesses a superfluity of creative forces and can assert one's will over long periods of time - in the form of legislation, religions, and customs.
The Will to Power (1888). Sec. 144
Nietzsche Quotes
Terribleness is part of greatness: let us not deceive ourselves.
The Will to Power, Book IV, Paragraph 1028
Nietzsche Quotes
This is the antinomy: Insofar as we believe in morality we pass sentence on existence.
The Will to Power (1888). Sec. 6
Nietzsche Quotes
     


Friedrich Nietzsche Quote of the Day

Wednesday, 29 January 2020
How is freedom measured, in individuals as in nations? By the resistance which must be overcome, by the effort it costs to remain on top. The highest type of free men should be sought where the highest resistance is constantly overcome: five steps from tyranny, close to the threshold of the danger of servitude. This is true psychologically if by "tyrants" are meant inexorable and dreadful instincts that provoke the maximum of authority and discipline against themselves - most beautiful type: Julius Caesar - ; this is true politically too; one need only go through history. The nations which were worth something, became worth something, never became so under liberal institutions: it was great danger that made something of them that merits respect. Danger alone acquaints us with our own resources, our virtues, our armor and weapons, our spirit - and forces us to be strong...Twilight of the Idols (1888)